Understanding the ICS Model and the Path to Completion Training Webinar

This FREE webinar will offer attendees an overview of the individual schedules of the Incurred Cost Submission and provide specific information to the importance of each. If you have the Allowable Cost and Payment Clause (FAR 52.216-7) within your contracts, you are required to complete an ICS within 6 months of your fiscal year end. This presentation by Mrs. Basden will assist you in understanding your ICS obligations and compliance requirements. Let’s get a jump on your submission early!

Total Time Accounting in the Govcon Environment (Uncompensated Overtime for FLSA Exempt Employees)

A Whitepaper by John C. Shire, CPA, Director, Redstone GCI & Asa Gilliland, President & Director, Redstone Government Consulting

Based on DCAA’s track record of disregarding its own guidance on what are acceptable accounting methods for contractors incurring potentially significant amounts of uncompensated overtime, DCAA is very likely to see the risk sufficient to report what they see as a non-compliance as a significant deficiency and therefore recommend system disapproval and the implementation of a withhold.

Cost Accounting for Software Related Costs To Be Sold, Leased, or Marketed

A Whitepaper by John C. Shire, CPA, Director, Redstone GCI

Does Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR) or Cost Accounting Standards (CAS) provide specific requirements when it comes to accounting for costs related to software to be sold, leased, or marketed in the future? The simple answer is “no”, however, a review of FAR Part 31 certainly supports that the cost is allowable and allocable to both individual contracts and as a benefit to more than one contract, based on the nature of the software related effort, provided the cost is reasonable. For the purposes of this whitepaper, we are going to assume the cost is reasonable in both nature and amount based on the prudent person in the conduct of competitive business test in FAR 31.201-3, determining reasonableness.

Novation Agreements – Prime U.S. Government Contracts Whitepaper

A Whitepaper by John C. Shire, CPA, Director, Redstone GCI & Jerome S. Gabig, Attorney, Wilmer & Lee

Although technically 41 USC § 6305 prohibits the transfer of Government contracts from one contractor to another, there are times when the Government realizes it is in its best interest to waive this rule—in a document called a novation agreement. If you want the Government to recognize your transfer, you need to design and execute an agreement that protects the Government while ensuring all parties assume (or waive) rights and obligations where necessary, including those situations where subcontracts are involved. Additionally, finding the Contracting Officer is another key step in the process of executing a novation agreement, especially where contracts are large enough to be administered by DCMA. Lastly, you must ensure that risks are averted in the transfer process, the required documentation is submitted, and the format meets FAR requirements before the Government finally gives its final approval.

Planning vs. Organization Costs

A White paper by John C. Shire, CPA, Director

Where does allowable planning end and unallowable organization begin? Two FAR clauses are at odds with each other in terms of merger/acquisition activities being allowable. Contractors need to understand where their planning activities cross the line from allowable, generalized consideration of an opportunity, to unallowable, where specific actions are taken to plan for a specific opportunity. Documenting decision-making, clarifying employee activity, and noting the point at which the organization’s decisions move from a generalized consideration to a specific opportunity plan will help avoid having salaries and employee efforts ruled unallowable by the Government.

What Are The Prime Contractor’s Risks Related to Subcontracts

A White paper by Asa Gilliland President & Director &
Robert L. Eldridge, CPA, Director

Due to several factors, including the desire to reduce the work for DCAA auditors, the federal government has put subcontractor audit responsibility on prime contractors. Although not specifically assigned to prime contractors in the regulation, it is assumed their responsibility. Learn why it is important for prime contractors to have guidance to monitor subcontractor awards and handle contract closeouts and audits.